Virtual Sunshine And Showers

Sunshine And ShowersIt is Friday, meaning that we have made it through another working week, with the emphasis strongly on the working bit. With the sword of Damocles still hanging over my head, it is a bit of a challenge to remain focussed, even though people keep telling me ‘You’ll be fine’. Sadly it’s not their decision, and the wait continues.

So it was a really nice surprise, when we had a visitor to the Ringwood office, a new guy who has been brought in to head up our ecommerce business unit, and it turned out that he’s only got one head, has worked for the likes of Amazon and Love Film, is very passionate about building the business and listens when people talk to him.

I really can see a positive light falling on the IT team. It felt like everyone has embraced the new energy and are buzzing with the enthusiasm our new leader has instilled. It remains to be seen where the line between the companies legacy ends, being established in 1856, and the adoption of new technologies begins. Philatelists are a funny bunch, in the nicest possible way, and it’s a fine line to be trodden.

The excitement is palpable and the way forward, for the team at least, is becoming clearer. The minor fly in the ointment, from my side of things, is that by this time next week, I may not be part of the team.

This is where my Buddhism kicks in, and in more ways than I had expected. My initial feeling is one of joy and excitement for the team. With second thoughts I see that their future may not be mine, but with that split comes a series of possibilities. I could see it as a potential crisis, but I am weighing up the balance between the danger and the opportunities and I see that the opportunities are winning hands down.

The way forward is to keep chanting, stay positive and wait to see what happens.

Nam Myoho Renge Kyo

Crisis Management

Challenges AheadWith the economy failing to show any signs of improvement, there is the ever present possibility of changes in our circumstances. Companies are constantly looking to cut costs, increase profits for their shareholders, and staff are often the unwitting victims of such changes. The result of all this may cause us to feel like we are heading for a personal crisis.

But there really is hope in such situations. The Chinese spell the word crisis with two characters. The first character means danger, the second, opportunity. So we can all look upon a crisis in two ways if we so choose.

Obviously, any crisis can be a source of danger. The very word conjures up a sense of foreboding, a situation that is out of control. But with that danger comes the opportunity to make something better with the energy that comes to us all when put in a dangerous position.

The natural rise in adrenalin when we face danger, the classic fight or flight reaction, gives us superhuman levels of energy. We have all heard of stories of incidents where someone has lifted a car off a trapped friend or family member or run incredibly fast to rescue a child from danger. It’s a natural reaction, it’s nothing superhuman at all.

Many of us need a short sharp shock to bring us out of a state of lethargy, something that sparks us into life and gives us the impetus to make huge positive changes to our lives. My own interest in Nichiren Buddhism was sparked by a sudden change in family situation, so I know that good things can come from a painful event.

If you find you are facing a crisis, take heart, remember that opportunity comes along as well as the danger, good fortune comes to those who seek it.

Challenges, Just A Fact Of Life

Just A Fact Of LifeSometimes, problems, or as we like to call them, challenges, seem to just keep on coming, one after another after another. With two deaths, as well as other problems associated with dementia in the family happening in the past few weeks, it’s been all too easy for us to start to wonder ‘What on earth have we done to deserve all this?

However, challenges are just a fact of life. It’s true that some people seem to have more challenges than others. It is also obvious that there are times when they appear to come along like buses, nothing for ages and then a bunch of them turn up at once.

What helps, or at least helps me, is to look upon them as a way to become stronger. Buddhism sees challenges as a way to strengthen your faith and your practice by turning their poison into medicine. Of course this is easier said than done, but over time it is amazing what a person can learn to deal with.

When a challenge rears its ugly head I try to think about it from a number of viewpoints. Chanting definitely helps me in this regard. While I’m chanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo, my mind is emptied of the minutia of daily life, so I can concentrate on the issue at hand. Finding the positives in a situation is never easy, but they are there if you care to look.

So even though things may look dark, that there is nothing but sorrow to be gained from some event, that really is not the case. Losing someone close may seem to be such a situation, but if that person was suffering, that suffering has now ended, which is positive. If someone has to go into care, that is very sad, but it means that they, and others, are safer in the process.

Whatever the situation, there are positives, all that is needed is to find them in amongst the morass of bad feelings we may be having. As I say, chanting allows me to do this, and although it may not work for you, giving it a chance certainly won’t make things worse. Having a really good chant raises my life-energy and life-state and that in turn makes me more able to confront things head on.

Take Heart

Crisis, What Crisis?With the huge cuts in public spending, there are thousands of jobs in jeopardy. I know of several people who are busy looking for new work after losing their jobs and it is easy to feel that a personal crisis might be looming.

But there is hope in such situations. The Chinese spell the word crisis with two characters. The first means danger. The second, opportunity. So we can all look upon a crisis in two ways.

Obviously, any crisis can be a source of danger. The very word conjures up a sense of foreboding, a situation that is out of control. But with that danger comes the opportunity to make something better with the energy that comes to us all when put in a dangerous position.

The natural rise in adrenalin when we face danger, the classic fight or flight reaction, gives us superhuman levels of energy. We have all heard of stories of incidents where someone has lifted a car off a trapped friend or family member or run incredibly fast to rescue a child from danger. It’s a natural reaction, it’s nothing superhuman at all.

When we couple this energy with the Buddhist principle of turning Poison into Medicine, there can be a very real opportunity to use the situation to our own advantage. How often have you heard about people who turn an impossible situation into a an amazing success story. J.K. Rowling reportedly wrote the first Harry Potter book whilst in sheltered accommodation. Duncan Bannatyne built his business empire from scratch after coming from a less than privileged background.

Many of us need a short sharp shock to bring us out of a state of lethargy, something that sparks us into life and gives us the impetus to make huge positive changes to our lives. My own interest in Nichiren Buddhism was sparked by a sudden change in family situation, so I know that good things can come from a painful event.

If you find you are facing a crisis, take heart, remember that opportunity comes along as well as the danger, good fortune comes to those who seek it.

Crisis, What Crisis?

Crisis - Danger + OpportunityWith the huge cuts in public spending, there are thousands of jobs in jeopardy. I know of several people who are busy looking for new work after losing their jobs and it is easy to feel that a personal crisis might be looming.

But there is hope in such situations. The Chinese spell the word crisis with two characters. The first means danger. The second, opportunity. So we can all look upon a crisis in two ways.

Obviously, any crisis can be a source of danger. The very word conjures up a sense of foreboding, a situation that is out of control. But with that danger comes the opportunity to make something better with the energy that comes to us all when put in a dangerous position.

The natural rise in adrenalin when we face danger, the classic fight or flight reaction, gives us superhuman levels of energy. We have all heard of stories of incidents where someone has lifted a car off a trapped friend or family member or run incredibly fast to rescue a child from danger. It’s a natural reaction, it’s nothing superhuman at all.

When we couple this energy with the Buddhist principle of turning Poison into Medicine, there can be a very real opportunity to use the situation to our own advantage. How often have you heard about people who turn an impossible situation into a an amazing success story. J.K. Rowling reportedly wrote the first Harry Potter book whilst in sheltered accommodation. Duncan Bannatyne built his business empire from scratch after coming from a less than privileged background.

Many of us need a short sharp shock to bring us out of a state of lethargy, something that sparks us into life and gives us the impetus to make huge positive changes to our lives. My own interest in Nichiren Buddhism was sparked by a sudden change in family situation, so I know that good things can come from a painful event.

If you find you are facing a crisis, take heart, remember that opportunity comes along as well as the danger, good fortune comes to those who seek it.

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