On What Ifs

What If?Sometimes, we find ourselves in situations, or potential situations, were we are a little unsure of what the outcome may be.

Our minds race, we mull over the possibilities, the what ifs, the maybes, and it can be all too easy to form ideas in our minds as to how things will pan out.

That’s fine, and perfectly normal, as long as we don’t let these expectations run away with us. Having a notional or preconceived idea is one thing, but pinning our hopes on that idea is a recipe for disaster. Things rarely, if ever, go exactly as we imagine.

So the trick is to keep a level head, let events unfold as they will, and be tolerant of the inevitable differences between what we expect, or would like, and what actually comes to pass.

But as someone once said ‘Be careful what you wish for, you might just get it’. Conversely it has also been said that ‘That thing you wished for, the thing you never got, might have been the most fortunate moment you could ever imagine’.

So muse away, daydream to your hearts content, but remember that at the end of the day, the truth of the situation will become clear soon enough.

All Things In Balance

Everything In BalanceThe China Study is a book that can really get under your skin. Having already rid my diet of meat and fish many years ago, I have turned from Vegetarian to Vegan in the past eight months, hence adding dairy and any animal derived products to my list of ‘banned’ substances. However, having put effort into researching the pros of such a diet, I needed to investigate the alternate view.

I found a few interesting counter-arguments on the internet, belittling the research of Dr Graham or citing other research that appears to reverse the findings used in the book. There is however, one difference between Dr Graham and his detractors, they all seem to have some agenda or are trying to sell something.

In trying to keep an open mind, I continue the diet, despite reading evidence that overturns almost everything I have ever been taught about diet and nutrition. I would like to be able to present you the truth, but it seems that it comes in a number of various hues.

You may have read my posts about the book. If you would like to read the other viewpoints I suggest you Google (other search providers are available) ‘china study myth’ and take your pick of the articles available.

From my own point of view? Well I didn’t start my HCRV diet because of the book, I fell into the book because of the diet. I feel that the example of Freelee and DurianRiders health and fitness lends at least as much evidence to back the diet as does the book.

I guess it’s a bit like not walking under a ladder, just in case you end up with some unfortunate outcome. Maybe it’s far more complicated than I’m describing, but with all the horror stories surrounding the food industry, I’m sticking to fruit and vegetables for the rest of this lifetime, at least.

Hidden Truths?

Pope FrancisI was dismayed to hear this morning, that the Catholic Church in England are refusing to publish the results of a recent survey of  sexual ethics of such subjects as contraception, cohabitation and homosexuality.

The German Catholic Church have published their results, but it seems that their English colleagues are sticking to Pope Francis’ request that they are not to be released until after further discussions on October.

What are they scared of revealing?  That their flock are completely at odds with the thinking of the clergy? It’s 2014 not 1814, the Inquisition is a thing of the past, people are allowed to have their own views, and have those views heard, aren’t they?

It’s none of my business, if I’m honest. I’m not, nor have I ever been Catholic, but I do strongly believe that honesty and openness are the way forward. If you don’t want to know the answer to something, don’t ask the question. But once it’s asked, let everyone know the outcome. To do otherwise simply encourages supposition and criticism.

The China Study – Proven (Again)

Everything In BalanceI make no apology for reposting this, in the wake of recent revelations… Having already rid my diet of meat and fish many years ago, I have turned from Vegetarian to Vegan in the past few weeks, hence adding dairy and any animal derived products to my list of ‘banned’ substances. However, having put effort into researching the pros of such a diet, I need to investigate the alternate view.

I have found a few interesting counter-arguments on the internet, belittling the research of Dr Graham or citing other research that appears to reverse the findings used in the book. There is one difference between Dr Graham and his detractors however, they all seem to have some agenda or are trying to sell something.

I am trying to keep an open mind, despite reading evidence that overturns almost everything I have ever been taught about diet and nutrition. I would like to be able to present the truth, but it seems that it comes in a number of various hues.

You may have read my posts about the book. If you would like to read the other viewpoints I suggest you Google (other search providers are available) ‘china study myth’ and take your pick of the articles available.

From my own point of view? Well I didn’t start my HCRV diet because of the book, I fell into the book because of the diet. I feel that the example of Freelee and DurianRiders health and fitness lends at least as much evidence to back the diet as does the book.

I guess it’s a bit like not walking under a ladder, just in case you end up with some unfortunate outcome. Maybe it’s far more complicated than I’m describing, but with all the horror stories surrounding the food industry, I’m sticking to fruit and veg for now.

The Truth, The Whole Truth, And Nothing Like The Truth

Drug Trials - Release All ResultsWith the news that the government are calling for pharmaceutical companies to release all the data relating to their drug trials, rather than the ‘cherry picked’ good news that they currently do, I wonder how long it will be before they also expose the association between dietary advice and the drug and food corporations?

We all know that milk is good for us, right? Wrong! Apart from the fact that a growing number of people are, or are becoming lactose insensitive, the high levels of fat in milk tends to increase the level of cholesterol in the blood, increasing the chance of blocking the arteries and hence the chance of heart attack and stroke.

The drug companies are generally in the business of treating symptoms, rather than curing the causes of illness. As such, they have a vested interest in people getting ill. The meat and dairy industries depend on us eating their products, even though there is a body of evidence to show that animal fat and protein causes cancer, heart disease and other illnesses.

Both industries spend huge amounts of money promoting their products, and not just in advertising, although that is the most visible channel for their message. They also sponsor education in areas from schools to medical colleges, so that their message is ingrained into our society across the board.

Now before someone jumps up and says, ‘hang on a minute, you were eating cheese and drinking milk not long ago’ I have to admit that was true, but I was one of the ‘brainwashed’ majority too, until fairly recently. Having discovered more of the ‘truth’ of late, I feel more and more irate about the way that we are misled.

Until we get some legal separation between government, agriculture, pharmaceuticals and the food corporations, we will never get the facts about such matters. The politicians are in the pockets of the people who run such organisations, so have little incentive to put things right. Scientists get paid to lend their names to unproven products, it is a huge web of lies.

It will be interesting to see how much effort they put behind opening up the drug trial data, but if you would like to learn more about things for yourself, you might start here.

A Balanced View?

Everything In BalanceThis China Study book is really getting under my skin. Having already rid my diet of meat and fish many years ago, I have turned from Vegetarian to Vegan in the past few weeks, hence adding dairy and any animal derived products to my list of ‘banned’ substances. However, having put effort into researching the pros of such a diet, I need to investigate the alternate view.

I have found a few interesting counter-arguments on the internet, belittling the research of Dr Graham or citing other research that appears to reverse the findings used in the book. There is one difference between Dr Graham and his detractors however, they all seem to have some agenda or are trying to sell something.

I am trying to keep an open mind, despite reading evidence that overturns almost everything I have ever been taught about diet and nutrition. I would like to be able to present the truth, but it seems that it comes in a number of various hues.

You may have read my posts about the book. If you would like to read the other viewpoints I suggest you Google (other search providers are available) ‘china study myth’ and take your pick of the articles available.

From my own point of view? Well I didn’t start my HCRV diet because of the book, I fell into the book because of the diet. I feel that the example of Freelee and DurianRiders health and fitness lends at least as much evidence to back the diet as does the book.

I guess it’s a bit like not walking under a ladder, just in case you end up with some unfortunate outcome. Maybe it’s far more complicated than I’m describing, but with all the horror stories surrounding the food industry, I’m sticking to fruit and veg for now.

Ifs, Buts and Maybes

Ifs, Buts and MaybesSometimes, we find ourselves in situations, or potential situations, were we are a little unsure of what the outcome may be.

Our minds race, we mull over the possibilities, the what ifs, the maybes, and it can be all too easy to form ideas in our minds as to how things will pan out.

That’s fine, and perfectly normal, as long as we don’t let these expectations run away with us. Having a a notional or preconceived idea is one thing, but pinning our hopes on that idea is a recipe for disaster. Things rarely, if ever, go exactly as we imagine.

So the trick is to keep a level head, let events unfold as they will, and be tolerant of the inevitable differences between what we expect, or would like, and what actually comes to pass.

But as someone once said ‘Be careful what you wish for, you might just get it’. Conversely it has also been said that ‘That thing you wished for, the thing you never got, might have been the most fortunate moment you could ever imagine’.

So muse away, daydream to your hearts content, but remember that at the end of the day, the truth of the situation will become clear soon enough.

What Is Love?

Two HeartsLoving, and being loved is really great isn’t it? There is little to compare with the feeling one gets from being part of a loving relationship, but there are two types of love, unconditional and conditional. Unconditional love is about giving without limits, about being happy for the happiness of others. Conditional love, on the other hand, can be painful for both parties. Elements of jealousy, or the need to be loved in order to love, can lead the way to a painful end of the relationship.

Buddhism defines love as an action. It is that force that motivates people to become better, to improve themselves in order to reach eternity and happiness. Love brings out the best in people, as when they love, the target is not themselves but the beloved one. This wish to serve the other is a reflection of an innate knowledge that everyone is connected through the same principle, and therefore, it is an illusion to believe that one can achieve true happiness while those around haven’t attained it . So, love is the action that makes people forego their own ego and concentrate their efforts on the other in a search for fulfilment.

Personally, I have been criticised for suggesting that, if my partner would be happier with someone else, that I would not stand in their path. That feeling, I believe, shows that I love them unconditionally and, arguably, more than someone who wants to control or confine them. It does not mean that I want them to go, just that I want them to be happy, and that my happiness is found through their happiness.

Achieving unconditional love is hard. So many people feel that they need to be loved to be happy. In fact, the most happiness comes from loving another, and the need to be loved is often a sign of insecurity. Loving unconditionally requires a totally unselfish attitude to the other. Being happy when they are happy, being happy for them when they succeed, rather than feeling jealous of their success. Keeping those negative feelings in check requires constant effort, but the happiness gained from so doing is unbounded.

So take a look at your motives next time you tell that special someone that you love them. Will you still love them if that love is not reciprocated? Are you happy for them when they find pleasure in something that is of no interest to you? Would you sacrifice the relationship if that added to their happiness? If the answer to any of those questions is no, then you are not loving unconditionally.

It is not the end of things if you are not, there is always time to change. Loving everyone, in the broadest sense of the word, is a very rewarding way to lead your life. Being concerned for the happiness of someone who clearly has no time for you is tough. Going the extra mile to ensure that the happiness of another at the expense of yourself is not necessarily a natural thing to do, but the rewards for doing so are great indeed.

So next time you say ‘I love you’ to someone, try mentally tagging on ‘no matter what’ to that phrase and see how that makes you feel inside. If you can honestly say that it makes no difference to you saying it, then you have reached the state of unconditional love and that will reward you every time you say it.

The Truth Will Out

The Scales Of JusticeWith the final admission today, by ex-MP Chris Huhne, that he has been attempting to pervert the course of justice by lying to police about a motoring offence that happened over ten years ago, we can see that the lack of honesty can bring about anyone’s downfall .

Lying, or even being economical with the truth can swiftly get badly out of control. One lie leads to another, to another and so on, as the purveyor of untruths attempts to cover each falsehood with the next. How much better would it be for all concerned, in the long run, if the truth were told from the outset?

We might feel a modicum of compassion for Huhne, given that he has been described by colleagues as a very hard working MP. However, I think it only right that he serve a custodial sentence, bearing in mind the position of responsibility he held at the time, the number of people he has let down by his attempted deceit and the length of time he has taken to admit to the offence.

The court will decide his fate shortly, but it has already been mooted that he will serve time inside one of Her Majesty’s prisons. Sadly, like many other of his parliamentary colleagues over the last few years, he has been found to be a downright dishonourable member. Oh how the mighty are fallen, hoist by their own petard.

Devastation

Lance ArmstrongWhat is one supposed to do when a person you have looked up to for many years refuses to fight allegations of being a cheat? Lance Armstrong, seven times winner of the Tour de France, the most gruelling cycle race in the world, has today decided not to contest the allegations of drug taking lodged against him, leading to the conclusion that they do hold some truth.

I am sure that there are many, many cycling enthusiasts who will feel a huge amount of disillusionment at his decision. Armstrong. who overcame testicular cancer to return to the event, was a true hero of the sport and now stands to lose all his titles as well as a great deal of the love and respect he has built up over the years.

Cycling is just another sport that has been tainted by doping. Alberto Contador, currently lying in forth place in the Vuelta a Espana, the Tour of Spain has just returned to the sport after a ban for failing a doping test. The list of sportsmen and women who have been caught using performance enhancing drugs just continues to get longer.

Do these athletes get coerced into using drugs, by the pressure of sponsors or team managers for them to perform beyond their limit? Or is it the result of highly competitive people using every option available to them to make it to the top of their sport. It would be nice to think that they had little choice in the matter, but the doubt remains.

With sports coverage at an all time high, following the hugely successful London Olympics, its influence on youngsters is greater than ever. Whilst I am devastated by the news of my hero Armstrong, I feel he has to be given a substantial punishment, if only to send a sign out to these young people, that cheating is not the way to get to the top.

As with all figures in the public gaze, there comes, with the notoriety and rewards, a responsibility to behave in a way that sends out a positive message. Knowing how much his Tour wins meant to Armstrong, I wonder how he can now hold his head high in public? It’s a huge disappointment and I hope that the truth will finally be known.

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