10 Years, And It Still Hurts Like Hell

My DadToday is one of those anniversaries that I really don’t look forward to. As I write this, it is exactly ten years, almost to the minute, since my Dad passed on. Strange, because the 27th of September had always been a special day, it was also his mother’s, my Nan’s, birthday.

On that day, 10 years ago, we knew that Dad wasn’t well. He’d suffered from Angina since his early sixties, but that was under control, as were his cholesterol levels. But he had had a silly little accident, dropped a heavy wooden box on his shin, and the resulting wound refused to heal.

Because he was forced to rest the leg, he stopped going out for walks and could usually be found sitting reading, or sleeping, in his chair in the lounge. He started to put on a bit of weight and whenever he did venture out, would have to stop occasionally to draw breath.

But that wasn’t really why he was in hospital that day. He had gone, the day before, to have some routine tests. During the tests they noticed that he had a rather swollen belly, and asked him a bit about it.

It turned out that he had been having a bit of trouble with his ‘plumbing’ and actually had a very distended bladder. They used ultrasound to take a look inside, and decided that they should drain it using a catheter.

Now my Dad was a rather private and quite shy man, always kept himself to himself, and would have been most uncomfortable with this procedure. Not only that, but he was never one for staying away from home, even if it meant driving long hours to be in his own bed that night.

So when they told him that he had to remain in the hospital overnight, just as a precaution, so they could keep their eye on him, he would have been put under further stress. Whether it was as a result of this stress, or maybe the fact that having been drained of five litres of urine allowed his organs to settle into unfamiliar positions, we will never know, but that evening he had his first heart attack.

The medical staff made him comfortable and although it was worrying, when my Mom rang to tell us, we all felt he was in exactly the right place to be looked after and to recover. We talked about coming up to see him at the weekend and left it at that.

I don’t think I had even mentioned the new Jaguar I had picked up that day, but I was looking forward to showing Dad the car, he always loved Jags, though he’d never owned one. But driving to work the next morning, I was unaware that everything was going to change that day.

My mobile rang at about 9:30am, I was in the office, suited and booted as usual, it was my Mom. She was clearly upset, and told me that Dad had had a second, more serious heart attack a couple of hours earlier, and that I should come up to Sutton if I could. It’s a journey of about 100 miles, and I set off at once.

You can do an awful lot of thinking during a journey of that length. I wasn’t chanting back then, though I was a practicing Buddhist. Even the journey was strange. To start with, I was driving this brand new car, all shiny and bright, and trying to get there as fast as possible whilst still trying to break it in gently.

As I came off the M42 at Curdworth, I decided to take the back road to Bassetts Pole and come into Sutton from the North, to avoid any congestion. Big mistake, it was the Ryder Cup, being played at The Belfry, and I drove straight into all the hullaballoo.

A very nice Policewoman stopped me at a checkpoint. Understandably, wearing a sharp suit and driving a brand new Jag, she mistook me for one of the players, or an official, definitely somebody connected to the golf. I explained the situation, that I was rushing to get to the hospital, that my Dad was very ill, she asked me to wait.

I was sandwiched between two pairs of Police motorcycles and we set off at pace. The two riders in front went ahead to clear the route, stop the traffic at islands, lights etc. while the two at the rear leapfrogged at each junction and went ahead to continue the process.

I have never driven so fast on a public road, they were amazing, and we reached the hospital in double quick time. One officer took my keys and told me to go to find my Dad while he parked the car. After it was all over, I wrote a letter to the Chief Constable, thanking them for their help.

I rushed to Intensive Care, where I found Mom sitting in an ante-room. She was looking very worried, but was pleased to see me, we talked about what was happening. Then a doctor came in, asked us to sit down, and gave us an update. I asked whether I could go and see my Dad, I had a heavy cold and didn’t want to make things worse. The doctor explained that I couldn’t make it any worse and ushered me into the room.

My Dad was covered in wires and pipes. A respirator, heart monitor and all manner of machines were gathered around the bed. He was unconscious, and the nurse explained that he had been sedated to stop him from suffering any pain. We sat with him for a while, just watching his chest moving up and down as the machine kept him breathing.

The nurse asked us to go back to the ante-room and told us that the doctor would be in to talk to us shortly. When it came, the doctor’s message was short and to the point, and although he spoke very quietly and calmly, there was no easy way to say it. My Dad was being kept alive by the machines, the damage to his heart was too severe for him to recover, and they asked us whether they could turn the machines off.

I don’t really remember what was said, but they went away to turn off the apparatus, to remove the wires and pipes and to clean Dad up a little. We just sat and waited. When they were ready, we went back into the room, the machines were gone and Dad was lying motionless on the bed.

I say it was Dad. But actually I remember thinking it looked like a waxworks model of him. The total absence of life had changed everything. It looked like my Dad, but it wasn’t my Dad, something very essential was missing.

We took a little while to say our goodbyes, the staff were very kind and looked after us, but their jobs were done. I don’t remember whether I cried, I don’t remember Mom crying, we just looked after each other.

I do remember walking down a long, long corridor towards the hospital entrance. There were people laughing, whistling, running about. Life was going on as usual. But my Dad had just died, what were they thinking?

But slowly the truth becomes clear. We are all part of the Universe, all connected through the universal life-force, but when we die, the Universe continues, life continues, the Wheel of Life continues, to roll inexorably on.

So September the 27th is a day I hate to remember, but it is a day I shall never forget. My Buddhist faith has put a different slant on the events of that day. I know that my Dad is back, somewhere, leading his new life. Knowing that takes some of the pain of losing him away, and for that I am very grateful.

I love you and miss you Dad, it’s a pity you never got to see the Jaguar.

11 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. chloethewriter
    Sep 27, 2012 @ 23:36:33

    A beautifully written, poignant post, very real and touching; I now have a huge lump in my throat. Sending lots and lots of good vibrations your way.

    Reply

  2. Lois
    Sep 28, 2012 @ 00:06:35

    A very moving post

    Reply

    • Anupadin
      Sep 28, 2012 @ 01:10:48

      Thank you Lois. How are you getting along with the books?

      Reply

      • Lois
        Sep 28, 2012 @ 08:58:43

        I have had a busy time with children off to Uni etc and this week has been catching up on stuff, but guess what, next week I am doing nothing… so I can sit quietly and read and enjoy and learn!

      • Anupadin
        Sep 28, 2012 @ 11:18:49

        Ah … Bliss 🙂

      • Lois
        Sep 28, 2012 @ 21:02:57

        I’ve just realised I’ve lent my KIndle to a friend with the William Woollard book, so I’ve just this minute ordered the other one you recommended! Thanks! Namaste!
        Oh and I have just realised who William Woollard is! I always liked him as a reporter and presenter.

      • Lois
        Oct 05, 2012 @ 19:07:13

        ‘The Buddha, Geoff and me’ arrived yesterday, I just glanced at the first page and then had to stop for lunch 50 pages later! Great book – really interesting, and when I went to my class last night there were a couple of things that were really useful! Thanks for the recommendation… still waiting to get my Kindle back to be able to read William!

      • Anupadin
        Oct 05, 2012 @ 19:15:03

        I have lost count of the number of copies I have given away. It really is a page turner, and you find you can really relate to Ed’s challenges and Geoff’s wonderful advice (well I can).

        The audiobook version, with thanks to Jason Jarrett, is really, really well done.

        You can listen to it here …

        https://skydrive.live.com/redir?resid=AE026BEE5A6D276F!677&authkey=!AHWcxL5W74pkx_c

        Namaste,

        Anupadin

      • Lois
        Oct 05, 2012 @ 19:31:23

        Oh thanks very much! Namaste!

  3. tersiaburger
    Sep 28, 2012 @ 09:59:36

    Thank you for sharing. It is a tender and moving post and reminded me so much of my mom’s passing. I too recall walking down the long, clinically clean and cold corridors thinking how can people laugh? Don’t they know my Mom just died? Now my daughter is terminally ill and I get angry with the world for carrying on regardless of her journey.

    Reply

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